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20110701
20110731
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CSPAN 8
CNN 3
CNNW 3
CSPAN2 1
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English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
. in the south, there is a lot of open combat. this is the headquarters of the taliban. >> in the east the violence depends on where you are. these to have strong relationships with kabul, with a lot of traffic. today, these are what i call, bombing galleries, where the coalition troops and a large coalition presence is trying very hard to like this town in order to protect this. but every step that they take, they are threatened. thousands every year, that are killing hundreds of native troops, and many times the number of afghans. as we move closer to the border, and you had se, the threat will change. this is not so much ied's because there is less vehicle traffic. the coalition soldiers and the taliban will move on foot. the coalition has helicopters, but then they are back to walking around on foot. this is a lot less useful and they are optimized for -- in places like this you see more small arms fire, lots of snipers. this looks like a street battle in world war two, on a smaller scale. people throwing grenades and things like this. on the coalition side, there is a great air po
where we are training security forces and where we are working to provide stability against the taliban and the kind of structure that we need to support going after al qaeda in pakistan and afghanistan -- that perhaps it is time to shut down $17 billion worth of money going to reconstruction projects when our track record really stings. i hope you all will convince me i am too cynical and angry and frustrated about the way we are spending money in theater. and i want to tell you, i am looking for good news and i hope we hear some today. there are too many people in missouri saying why can we fix this road, and then i look of the projects we are doing in afghanistan and it is very hard to explain to them why we can't fix that the road because we can't afford it -- yet we can throw money away in afghanistan on projects that were clearly not sustainable. and anybody spend any time thinking about it in the first place we would realize that. that kind of planning has to begin happening and that kind of accountability has to be present. senator portman is here. i will give him a time to get
explosives and cargo planes bound for the united states. it was the taliban and pakistan s sent a man on a failed attempt to blow up an suv in times square. it is a al qaeda is in here adherents,individuals, sometimes with little or no physical contact to al qaeda had succumbed to its hateful ideology and have a engaged in or facilitated terrorist activities in the united states. these misguided individuals are spurred on by the likes of -- -- we have seen the tragic results of that military murder and the attack in fort hood did this is the first counterterrorism strategy that focuses on the ability of rocket and its networks to inspire people to attack us -- of al qaeda and its networks to inspire people to attack us from within. president obama have made it a priority to renew american leadership in the world, strengthening our alliances, deepening partnerships. al qaeda seeks to make america look like an enemy to the world's most and -- world's muslim. al qaeda 6 to bleed as financially by dryness into a long drawn-out wars that inflame -- seeks to lead us financially by driving u
at these countries, that they are not radicals connected to terrorists like al qaeda or the taliban, or the muslim brotherhood. in egypt, for instance, right now, and tunisia and other countries in the middle east, we do not know who is going to be in charge. we are talking about supporting various governments, when they have an election. until we see what happens in the elections, we should not be giving money to those who are sympathetic in working with terrorist organizations in do not have our interests at stake. or want to destroy the state of israel. so, right now, for instance, in egypt the barrier between egypt and gaza has been broken down, in effect. hamas, in control of gaza right now, can bring in more weapons to attack israel. a signal that really bothers me, because it indicates to the muslim but -- brotherhood that they have more influence than people realize. in the past they have asked for the destruction of israel. and host: the muslim brotherhood is not considered a terrorist group. guest: if you look at their history, they have been committed to changes in the middle east, incl
with the taliban about ceasefires and their entry in the government. in other words, he was a practical deal maker. now, he was famous in the west or notorious for the corruption that surrounded him. but corruption surrounded all of the billions of dollars in american and western military aid and spending being brought into afghanistan. everyone in afghanistan was corrupt. amid karzai was an ally and effective deal maker. a journalist recalls he was a wheeler dealer in the classic afghan mode. but if tefs a rogue, he was a loveable rogue who charmed you, one way of doing political business in afghanistan. karzai's death reminds us it is the kind of political business he excelled at that we need urgently. that is what will ultimately bring stability to afghanistan, whether the united states has a hundred thousand troops or 50,000, whether it withdraws as a slow or rapid pace. at some point the afghan government will have to make deals with those who wooeled power on the ground. it likely will never work in a country with afghanistan's geography, ethnicity and history. what will work is a political
the various elements of the taliban and others. but of course in the conflict of building, helping, developing projects going on designed to do one big strategic thing wherever you look in the middle east and that is to shore up the strength and responsiveness of the state's wherever we look whether it's iraq or afghanistan to prevent pakistan from continuing to fail, the idea of the two-stage solution for israel and palestine or all within the concept of the system and if we don't have strong response things are going in the wrong direction. >> host: what i see on the ground and a travel to afghanistan is to be honest with all the power of the u.s. military you have an incredibly confident will lead military. in the and that's not enough to substitute for the government's of the afghan states and institutions provide and and pushing we just never quite get there. it's hard to find anybody -- >> guest: that's true, too. this brings us back to something like democratization and the culture in their view is going to be something where the people will have a way if you change those that are going
. >> general, chuck hoss kinson from politico. you said before that with the problem of infiltration of taliban into afghan security forces, as the afghans take over more and more responsibility that there might be a need to accept a greater risk in terms of dealing with that problem. how would you assess the possibility of that risk going forward now and what steps would you be taking to mitigate it? >> the mitigation of that risk is being done by a combination of counterintelligence effort, by the coalition forces and most importantly the afghan national security forces are taking it head on. it's an issue of leadership and knowing your people and the afghan leadership and chain of command is taking that on and i believe we're moving in the right direction with that risk. >> i want to thing che -- change the subject real quick work the upcoming transition in the army, i was wondering if you could talk a little bit about your interactions with general odeer noah and your thoughts on his leadership for the army going forward. >> i've had just one interact with general odierno at a utility confe
on with the taliban. do you feel the taliban should be part of afghanistan going forward? guest: the reconciliation is one of the major national programs our government already initiated. we have agreed with our international partners to have this reconciliation program. our president a couple of weeks back mentioned talks with different people going on through different channels. we have a high peace council the mainly responsible for the reconciliation. they have opened to the channel of communications. when you want to reconcile with people, you have to talk to them and open the channels for communication. there are different channels that want to reach out to opposition forces for the success of the reconciliation program. host: what about separating the taliban and al qaeda? guest: this is an afghan national program. is supported by the international community. our partners are saying it is an afghan-led reconciliation program. the afghans should be in the driving seat. we have three principles for that. the first one is to cut ties with al qaeda. the second one is to renounce violence. the th
democracy. with the american acquiescence and saudi financeing, the pakistani government created the taliban as islamabad's van guard for the conquest of afghanistan. in the process they set in place a fundamentalist antiwestern radical terrorist state. let's note that even after 9/11, after 3,000 of our citizens had been slaughtered, the i.s.i. continued to covertly support radical islamic terrorists and they are still engaged in such hostile acts, even as american lives are being lost even today. in 2010 the london school of economics published a report that found agents of the i.s.i., this is 2010, long after 9/11, were, quote, funding and training the afghan taliban, end of quote. and the top things are -- to top this off, there is substantial reporting that has been done that suggests that pakistani diplomats are lobbying the afghanistan government -- afghan government leaders suggesting that they dump the united states and turn to china for a partnership and re-- in reconstruction. this isn't shame on them, this is shame on us. washington may be able to coerce and bribe islamabad into
extraordinary. toppling the taliban. training afghan forces. putting al qaeda under unprecedented pressure, killing osama bin laden. our troops have battled a brutal insurgency, given the iraqi people an opportunity for a better future. it is in their hands. although it does not always make the headlines, every day our forces are serving with distinction in far-flung corners of the world, from western europe to east asia, faced with relentless adversaries. our troops have proven themselves, proven to be a generation of not only warriors but innovators, led by men like admiral mullen, who i have always respected. as i have worked with him every day, i have grown to respect him even more for what he has done. the master new languages, develop and employ advanced new technologies. they have taken on responsibilities once reserved for colonels and generals. the responsibility has extended beyond the battlefield. i was talking with my good buddy two days ago. it is astounding what you guys have trained these young men and women to do. they not only have to be warriors. they have to be politicia
several months have been like? the taliban has been exerting its influence in the area. how has it been for you? >> for me and my men it's been quite busy. getting out there, getting after it. we've been steadily, you know, helping the afghan people here. we've been promoting a lot of projects, a lot of schools, getting out there every day. >> also, congratulations on that promotion. >> thank you. >> also, much has been said about the draw down. you and some of your men will be leaving in just a few weeks. how do you feel about that? because there's been, you know, politically there's been discussions on both sides, some saying it's time for the draw down, others saying not the time for it. >> you know it's very exciting for us. it's about time about time we start looking at a draw plan and getting back to our families. we've been at it about ten years now. >> long time. >> long time. and, you know, it's about time the afghan people start taking responsibility of their country. >> it is the fourth of july, i know you guys, you're able to have some of the fourth of july barbecue lunch to
a number of problems a number of years ago, rising taliban. are we putting those remaining troops at risk? are we going to see higher casualty counts as a result? >> it's likely. the commanders still have the mission to win and they will go about that task as we speak. they're looking at all the options and there are creatives ways they can do that. but with those kind of numbers leaving, they are frankly going to ask our troops to do more with less. that will drive up casualties as a result of this. i just wonder if that was ever given a consideration when these options were being looked at and the commanders' recommendations were being ignored. >> may not send the right message to our troops, but you would like to send a special message to our troops on this fourth of july. what is that? >> thanks for that opportunity. we're the oldest democracy in the world and the rest of the world looks to us as a model for freedom and democracy. this has come at some sacrifice to us and the american people to preserve our liberties and our values. our troops out there today are doing that very thing
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)